Nippattu Recipe | Thattai Recipe

nippattu recipe

Nippattu Recipe: Nippattu is a spicy karnataka or south indian deep fried snack that is ideal for tea time. Deepavali, Ganesh Chaturthi, and even Krishna Janmashtami are common occasions for its preparation.

Nippattu is a traditional South Indian snack made from rice flour and plain flour. There are numerous ways to prepare nippattu, but this is my mother’s recipe. When paired with masala chai, the crunchy bites of peanuts and gramme dal (putani) enhance the flavour.

I decided to try the recipe one day and made it. Thattai was crispy, crunchy, and delicious. It was definitely better than the store-bought ones because there was no smell of old oil. It wasn’t too spicy for us, which is unusual because store-bought ones are usually too spicy.

After making the thattai, I realised it was time to share the recipe on the blog. I made a few changes to the recipe that have only improved it. These thattai keep their crispness. So you won’t have to worry about them becoming soft after a few days. The recipe yields 25 thattai and can easily be multiplied by increasing the proportion of ingredients. So, let us look at the detailed method of making thattai, complete with step-by-step instructions.

Thattai is a crisp deep-fried cracker made from rice flour, lentil flours, spices, and herbs. A basic thattai recipe calls for a dough made of rice flour, roasted and ground urad dal flour, soaked chana dal, grated or sliced fresh coconut (optional), curry leaves, asafoetida (hing), ground green chillies or red chilli powder, salt, and butter or ghee.

These crispy crackers are known as Thattai in Tamil Nadu. These are known as Nippattu in Karnataka and Chekkalu in Andhra Pradesh. In these regions, the method of preparation varies, but the basic ingredients remain the same. Thattai is also known as Thattu vadai and Thattu murukku.

This is one of those snack recipes that I had overlooked until now and should have shared a video recipe for a long time ago. I received several requests to share a video recipe for this favourite south Indian rice cracker, but I became distracted with other recipes. Deepali, my friend asked me to make some authentic Karnataka snacks for her because she enjoys her tea with some snacks at work. Nippattu was my first choice without hesitation, and she was pleased with the outcome.

In addition, some helpful hints and suggestions for a perfect thattai recipe. To begin, add a tbsp of semolina / sooji rava to make the nippattu more crunchy. To make it more crunchy, drizzle extra hot oil / ghee over the flour. Chekkalu tastes even better when coarsely powdered groundnuts and peanuts are added, as the crunchy bites enhance the flavour. Nippattu, as we all know, is a deep-fried karnataka snack that is ideal for the upcoming Deepavali / Diwali celebration.

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Nippattu Recipe Card:

nippattu recipe

Nippattu Recipe

Manita
Nippattu are crispy deep fried rice crackers from Karnataka cuisine. These are eaten as a Evening Snack and are also made during festivals. Nippattu are similar to Thattai from Tamilnadu and Chekkalu from Andhra pradesh. Though all 3 of them use similar ingredients, they differ in taste & texture.
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 35 mins
Course snacks
Cuisine South Indian
Servings 18 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 1/4 cup  peanuts   (roasted)
  • 1/4 cup putani / roasted gram dal
  • 2 tbsp  dry coconut / kopra
  • 1/2 tsp  cumin seeds / jeera
  • 1 cup  rice flour / akki hittu
  • 1/4 cup  maida / all purpose flour / plain flour
  • 2 tbsp  semolina / sooji / bombay rava
  • 1 tsp  kashmiri red chili powder / lal mirch powder
  • 1 tsp  sesame seeds / til
  • pinch of asafoetida / hing
  • 1 tbsp  curry leaves / kadi patta
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tbsp hot oil
  • water as required   (to knead)
  • oil for deep frying

Instructions
 

Step-by-step instructions for making chekkalu or nippattu:

  • First, combine the roasted peanuts, putani, dry coconut, and jeera in a small blender.
  • Make a coarse powder.
  • Transfer to a large mixing bowl after that.
  • Also add 1 cup rice flour, 1/4 cup maida, and 2 tbsp semolina.
  • Add red chilli powder, sesame seeds, curry leaves, and salt to taste.
  • Mix thoroughly to ensure that everything is well combined.
  • Lastly, drizzle hot oil over the flour. This contributes to the crunchiness of nippatu.
  • Because the oil will be too hot, mix with a spoon. Crumble the flour again with the oil.
  • Alternatively, add water in batches and knead the dough.
  • Knead into a smooth and soft dough similar to chapathi dough.
  • Make a ball out of the dough by dividing it into 2-3 equal parts. Pat them into a small, thick disc instead.
  • Furthermore, grease it will slightly oil. This keeps the dough from sticking to the rolling pin. Pat them into a thick disc instead.
  • As with paratha, roll the dough slightly thick.
  • Cut into round shapes with a cookie cutter or the lid of a box.
  • Deep fry the nippatus in batches in hot oil. Do not overcrowd the nippatu because it takes a long time to cook.
  • Fry the nippatu or thattai on medium heat until completely cooked.
  • Fry the thattai or nippatu until golden brown and crispy. It takes approximately 4 minutes.
  • To remove excess oil, drain on kitchen paper.
  • Finally, serve nippatu or thattai immediately or store in an airtight container for 10-15 days once completely cooled.
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Tips for making thattai:

The amount of asafoetida (hing) can be reduced if desired.
Taste the dough and add more salt if necessary.

The roasted chana dal can be omitted. Though it does help to make the thattai lighter and crisper.

Rice flour made from scratch can be used. Rice flour that has been parboiled can also be used.

The amount of water to be added will be determined by the texture of the flour. So knead in the parts.

You’ll need a semi-soft dough. Making the dough soft makes it difficult to shape and lift. If the dough is too stiff, the thattai will not be crisp. It will harden and become dense.
Fry the thattai in the oil until it stops bubbling. Fry over medium heat. When one side is crisp, flip it over. Cook until crisp and crunchy.

Make use of parchment or butter paper, as well as a ziplock bag. Apply a thin layer of oil to the parchment paper. Use your fingertips to press the thattai dough balls. Make it as thin as possible so that it can be lifted.

Skip the asafoetida for a gluten-free version of thattai.

To make a vegan version of thattai, substitute oil for the butter or ghee. You can also use vegan butter.

Notes:

  • To begin, if you are making a large batch, do not add water to the entire mixture. Instead, add water in batches to keep the nippattu from becoming soggy.
  • Nippatu is also delicious when prepared spicy and crunchy.
  • Most importantly, do not make too soft dough because it absorbs oil and hard dough is difficult to bite.
  • In addition, pat them into a disc to make them the traditional way. However, I prefer rolling because it is less time consuming and more presentable.
  • Also, fry on medium heat like chakli, or the inner part of the nippatu will be raw.
  • If desired, the amount of asafoetida (hing) can be reduced.
  • Taste the dough and add more salt if necessary.
  • The roasted chana dal can be omitted. Though it does help to make the thattai lighter and crisper.
  • Rice flour made from scratch can be used. Rice flour that has been parboiled can also be used.
  • The amount of water to be added will be determined by the texture of the flour. So knead in the parts.
  • You’ll need a semi-soft dough. Dough that is too soft is difficult to shape and lift. If the dough is too stiff, the thattai will not be crisp. It will harden and become dense.
  • Fry the thattai in the oil until it stops bubbling. Fry over medium heat until crisp and crunchy.
  • Make use of parchment or butter paper, as well as a ziplock bag. Apply a thin layer of oil to the parchment paper. Use your fingertips to press the thattai dough balls. Make it as thin as possible so that it can be lifted.
  • Skip the asafoetida for a gluten-free thattai.
  • Use oil instead of butter or ghee to make a vegan thattai. You can also use vegan butter.
  • Add some rice flour if the dough becomes too soft.
  • Sprinkle some water on the dough if it appears dry or hard.
  • Finally, nippatu or thattai can be stored in an airtight container for up to 10-15 days.

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