Palak Pakoda Recipe |Spinash Fritters recipe

Palak Pakoda Recipe: Palak pakoda are deep-fried spinach fritters made from spinach leaves, gramme flour (besan), onion, herbs, and spices. These delectable palak pakora are a quick vegan snack. I’m going to show you two different and unique ways to make palak pakoda.

Simple Palak Pakoda – Finely chopped spinach leaves are mixed into a gramme flour batter and deep fried.
Crispy Spinach Fritters – Each spinach leaf is deep fried after being dipped in a spiced gramme flour batter. These fritters have a distinct spinach flavour.
Both methods are quick and simple, and the pakoras taste delicious. You are free to use whatever method you prefer.

In our house, our favourite evening snack is palak pakoda with a hot cup of masala chai. We would never pass up the opportunity to prepare this recipe and enjoy it with hot and sweet tomato sauce, especially on a lazy weekend evening or when the monsoon rain is in full swing.

Fritters are known in Hindi as pakoda or pakora. The Hindi word for spinach is palak. Palak pakoda, or spinach fritters, can be made in a variety of ways in Indian cuisine.

This traditional palak pakoda recipe is from my mother’s collection. They are made with besan (gramme flour) and onions, as well as spices, herbs, and white sesame seeds.

The sesame seeds give the palak pakora a lovely flavour and a light crunch. The onions add sweetness, which helps to balance out the metallic flavours of the spinach.

Besan, also known as gramme flour, is made from ground skinned small black chickpeas. Besan is not the same as chickpea flour, which is made from white chickpeas.

If you want to hide the spinach in the fritters for kids who don’t like it, try this palak pakoda recipe.
If you don’t want to fry them, you can easily bake them. Of course, they’ll be a healthier option, thanks to the spinach, sesame seeds, and gramme flour.

I understand that this is a deep-fried recipe, and I shouldn’t discuss the health benefits. However, spinach, also known as palak, has numerous health benefits on its own. It aids or regulates diabetics, and spinach is high in antioxidants and prevents cancer. Aside from these advantages, it also reduces blood pressure and asthma symptoms.

Helping Tips:

 Spinach is listed really high on the Dirty Dozen list. If possible, please try to buy organic or grow your own.

Add 1 to 2 small spoons of batter to the oil to see if it’s ready to fry in. If the batter sizzles and slowly rises to the surface, your oil is hot enough to begin frying.

You can vary the number of pakoda you fry depending on the size of the pan or kadai – but don’t add too many or overcrowd the pan.

Spices and herbs: Spinach has metallic undertones. To balance these flavours, the batter must be perfectly seasoned with spices and herbs. Though this recipe does not yield a spicy palak pakora, you can increase the proportion of green chillies and red chilli powder if you prefer.

No onion variation: If you don’t like onions, simply leave them out.

Spinach: Fresh or frozen spinach can be used. Baby spinach is also tasty.

Thawing frozen spinach: When frozen spinach thaws, it can become watery. To avoid this, squeeze the spinach in a tea towel or press it through a strainer after it has been thawed. Then continue with the pakoda recipe.
Baking & air frying: You can bake these palak fritters for health reasons. For 10 minutes, preheat your oven or air fryer. Then bake or air fry at 180°C for 10 minutes (356 degrees Fahrenheit). You can either add 1 to 2 tablespoons oil to the batter or brush the pakora lightly with oil when half-baked.
When making any kind of pakora, I try to avoid using baking soda or baking powder in the batter. 1 pinch baking soda or 1/4 teaspoon baking powder is added to the batter for a fluffy palak pakoda.

You can also see my other Indian Recipes Collection, it Includes various delicious sweet recipes such as Idli Dhokla Recipe and So on. 

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Palak Pakoda Recipe Card:

palak pakoda recipe

Palak Pakoda Recipe

Manita
With the arrival of the monsoon season, trust me when I say that Palak Pakoda is a delicious and healthy snack that your clan will devour! It's the best tea time treat because it's perfectly crispy on the outside. Here's how to do it.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 20 mins
Course snacks, street food
Cuisine north indian, South Indian

Ingredients
  

  • 10  palak leaves
  • 1/2 cup  besan / gram flour
  • 1/4 tsp  turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp  chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp  ajwain / caraway seeds
  • 1/2 tsp  chaat masala
  • salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp  rice flour
  • pinch of baking soda   (optional)
  • water as required to prepare batter
  • oil for deep frying

Instructions
 

  • Combine half a cup of besan, turmeric powder, chilli powder, ajwain, chaat masala, salt, and rice flour in a mixing bowl. Combine thoroughly.
  • Add a pinch of baking soda now. It is entirely optional. It does, however, make your pakoda fluffy.
  • Now, gradually add water to make a smooth batter.
  • Dip the entire palak leaf into the batter. Coat both sides with batter.
  • Drop slowly into hot oil and deep fry. Stir it up every now and then.
  • Fry them until they are crisp and golden brown.
  • Remove the pakodas and place them on a paper towel to drain.
  • Serve with tomato ketchup and masala chai on the side.
Keyword how to make palak pakoda, palak pakoda recipe, palak pakoda recipe easy, palak pakoda recipe in hindi

Notes:

  • To make it more spicy, increase the amount of chilli powder.
  • Frying your palak pakoda on medium heat makes it crispy and tasty.
  • Remove the palak leaves from the water and turn off the heat. Allow to dry after wiping with a cloth before preparing pakodas. Otherwise, the water content in palak causes the oil to sputter.
  • Pakodas become crisper when rice flour is added.
  • Palak can be chopped and mixed into the batter. Then deep fry in the same manner as onion pakodas, forming round balls.
  • Batter: The batter for this easy palak pakoda recipe is medium in consistency. Take care not to end up with a thin, runny, or thick batter. A thin batter will absorb too much oil, while a thick batter will result in doughy fritters.
  • Water proportion: For the batter, start with 12 cup water and add more only if necessary. Some spinach leaves or onions may contain more water than others, and the quality and texture of gramme flour vary from place to place. As a result, you must add water while keeping these factors in mind. I made the pakora with homemade gramme flour that is slightly coarse, so I added a little more water to the batter than I would have otherwise. Because the packaged flour is fine to ultrafine, you will need to use less water.
  • Deep frying oil: Use any neutral oil with a high smoke point for deep frying.
  • Spices and herbs: Spinach has metallic undertones. To balance these flavours, the batter must be perfectly seasoned with spices and herbs. My recipe will not produce a spicy pakoda, but you can adjust the amount of green chillies and red chilli powder to your liking.
  • The consistency of the spinach pakora batter is medium. Make no thin, runny, or thick batter. A thin batter will absorb too much oil, while a thick batter will result in doughy fritters. Add a few tablespoons of gramme flour if the batter becomes too thin. If the batter is too thick, thin it out with a little water.
  • Water proportion: Start with 12 cup water and add more only if necessary. Some spinach leaves or onions may have a high water content, and the quality of gramme flour varies from place to place. As a result, water must be added while keeping these factors in mind. I used home-ground gramme flour in this recipe. The flour in the package is fine or super fine. The flour I made from scratch was a little coarse. As a result, I obviously add a little more water to the batter than I would have otherwise.
  • No onion variation: If you don’t eat onions, simply leave them out of the pakora. It will still be delectable.
  • Spinach: Fresh or frozen spinach can be used. Baby spinach is also tasty.
  • Frozen spinach: When frozen spinach thaws, it can become watery. To avoid this, squeeze the spinach in a tea towel or press it through a strainer after it has been thawed. Then continue with the pakoda recipe.
  • Deep frying oil: Use any neutral oil with a high smoke point for deep frying.
  • Baking & air frying: You can bake these palak fritters for health reasons. For 10 minutes, preheat your oven or air fryer. Then bake or air fry at 180°C for 10 minutes (356 degrees Fahrenheit). You can either add 1 to 2 tablespoons oil to the batter or brush the pakora lightly with oil when half-baked.
  • 1 pinch baking soda or 14 teaspoon baking powder can be added to make a fluffy palak pakoda.

You can also make it using his method

Palak Pakoda Recipe
  1. Finely chop the palak or spinach leaves after thoroughly rinsing them in water. Set aside. 1.5 to 2 cups finely chopped spinach leaves are required.
  2. 1 green chilli, 1 teaspoon chopped ginger, and 13 cup chopped onions (chopped).
  3. Then stir in 1 teaspoon fennel seed powder, 1/4–1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder, 1 teaspoon coriander powder, 1 teaspoon cumin powder, a pinch of asafoetida (hing), and 1–1.5 tablespoons white sesame seeds.
  4. After that, add 1 cup besan (gramme flour) and salt to taste. At this point, you could also add a pinch of baking soda.
  5. Set aside for 5 minutes after thoroughly mixing all of the ingredients.
  6. Partially add the water. Remember that when the spinach and onions are combined with the salt and ground spices, they will release water. So be cautious when adding water.
  7. As I mentioned in step 5 above, first thoroughly combine the ingredients and set aside for 5 minutes. Then, first, add 1/2 cup of water. If the batter is still too thick, add a little more water.
  8. Mix thoroughly. To make a medium-strength batter, add water as needed.
  9. In a kadai or pan, heat the oil. Drop spoonfuls of the pakoda batter into the oil when it is medium hot.
  10. Fry them until they are pale gold in colour. Then, using a slotted spoon, turn over and fry the other side.
  11. Fry all of the palak pakoda until crisp and golden, turning over a couple of times.
  12. Using a slotted spoon, remove them.
  13. Place the palak pakora on kitchen paper towels to absorb any excess oil.
  14. Palak pakoda can be served hot or warm. By frying the pakora in batches, you can use up the entire batter.

FAQ’s

How can I tell if the oil is hot enough to fry in?

Keep the heat on medium or medium-high before you start frying. Food is typically fried at temperatures ranging from 180 to 190 degrees Celsius.

A frying thermometer can be used to check the temperature of the oil. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can use the method described below.

To the hot oil, add a few small spoons of the batter. If it sizzles and rises slowly and steadily, your oil is hot enough to start frying.

When the batter sinks to the bottom, it means the oil isn’t hot enough; thus, turn up the heat a notch.

When the batter cooks too quickly and becomes browned or burnt, the oil is too hot; therefore, reduce the heat slightly.

What’s the deal with my soggy pakoras?

If your pakora batter is too watery or runny, it will absorb too much oil and become soggy. Pakora will become soggy if fried on a low heat.

Fry pakora in batches at all times. Don’t crowd the oil with too many pakoras. This lowers the temperature of the oil, causing the pakora to absorb more oil and become soggy.

What can I do to make my pakora less oily?

Fry the pakoras in a skillet over medium-high heat. Fry in batches and don’t overcrowd the pan with pakoda. Continue to adjust the temperature.

Using 1 to 2 teaspoons hot oil in the batter not only makes the pakora crisper, but it also absorbs less oil.

If you made this recipe, please be sure to rate the recipe and comment how it was 🙂 You can also Sign up for my email newsletter for more delicious vegetarian recipes.