Kadak Chai Recipe

“You can’t get a cup of tea big enough or a book long enough to suit me.”

C.S. Lewis

Is there an Indian household that does not begin the day with a steaming cup of chai? Chai appears to be the beginning of every desi’s day. Chai is traditionally made with loose leaf black tea or tea bags (although I prefer loose leaf). Even though it is one of the most basic and popular South Asian beverages, there are a few tricks to bringing out the best flavour. Always add the milk while the tea is on the stove, not after it has been brewed. You can use any type of cow’s milk you want: full fat, low fat, skimmed, condensed, or evaporated. I prefer the creaminess that full fat milk adds to chai, so that’s the milk I use. Sugar can be added directly to the chai after adding the milk, or to the cups after the chai has been strained. I prefer the latter because it uses less sugar.

Tea is a popular beverage. Almost every man, rich or poor, young or old, drinks tea at least once a day. Tea is inexpensive and refreshing. China, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Sri Lanka are all excellent tea growing countries. There are many tea gardens in Bangladesh, particularly in Sylhet and Chittagong. Tea grows best on the dry slopes of hills and mountains, which are ideal for tea cultivation. Snow seeds of plants are planted in rows three or four feet apart by tea planters. When the plants reach a height of about six feet, they are pruned. The plants then become bushy and produce a large number of leaves. Tender leaves are plucked and sun-dried. These leaves are sometimes soaked before being allowed to dry. The dried leaves have been packaged and are ready for sale. Making tea is not a difficult task. The leaves are immersed in boiling water, which is poured through a strainer into cups. Then, to make it more tasty, sugar and milk are added. The tea is then ready to be consumed. Tea is one of Bangladesh’s cash crops. Exporting foreign currency allows us to earn a lot of money. As a result, we should take care of its development.

AuthorManita

Yields2 Servings
Prep Time5 minsCook Time10 minsTotal Time15 mins

 2 cups water
 ½ cup milk
 2 tsp loose leaf black tea
 3 cardamom (freshly pounded or crushed}
 4 tbsp sugar {adjust to taste}

1

Fill the sauce pan halfway with water. Put the pan on high heat and add the crushed cardamom. On high heat, boil for 3-4 minutes.

2

When it begins to bubble, add the loose leaf tea. Allow the tea to boil for 4-5 minutes on medium heat, making sure it does not overflow.

3

Return to a medium heat and continue to boil for 3-4 minutes. Turn off the heat and strain the tea through a strainer. Add desired amount of sugar and serve!

Ingredients

 2 cups water
 ½ cup milk
 2 tsp loose leaf black tea
 3 cardamom (freshly pounded or crushed}
 4 tbsp sugar {adjust to taste}

Directions

1

Fill the sauce pan halfway with water. Put the pan on high heat and add the crushed cardamom. On high heat, boil for 3-4 minutes.

2

When it begins to bubble, add the loose leaf tea. Allow the tea to boil for 4-5 minutes on medium heat, making sure it does not overflow.

3

Return to a medium heat and continue to boil for 3-4 minutes. Turn off the heat and strain the tea through a strainer. Add desired amount of sugar and serve!

Kadak Chai Recipe